Poems by Asha Ramesh

The world that was…

a poem by

Asha Ramesh

His body shaking uncontrollably
With emotion so strong
That made his jaws chatter long
Hit as if by a gush of wind.

Start life, he has to, from scratch
Lost, he has, everything dear
He sees no road in front or anyone near
It is a journey, long and lonely, ahead.

The images flash past, one by one
Of hard work, joy and sorrow
Realizing dreams, one by one, for the morrow
Memories – now just stinging insect bites!

The faces dance in front of him
Like shadows in the dark
Without them, he cannot make a mark
Pain – now just a second skin!

He still can’t believe the way his world
Came crashing down suddenly;
Like a pack of cards built precariously
On grounds never thought shaky.

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The boy on the Train

a poem by

Asha Ramesh

Eyes listless, sunk deep and cast down,
A reflection of the burden,
Carried at an age so tender,
Thrashing the dreams of childhood!

Yet, occasionally, a ray of light invades
The eyes, as it roams all about the coach, so crowded
Searching for a buyer prospective
For his wares, precious.

Cute little teddies, he has
In colors varied, hanging from rings
Used to secure a lock,
Or the key to a door locked.

Take it, twist it and return it
They all do – satiating curiosity idle.
A sale or four is all he makes
Barely enough for the day’s meal!

As dusk falls, and the crowd disperses,
He gets off the coach and onto the station,
With hurried steps taking him homewards
And into the arms of the widow, invalid.

He hands over his earnings, meager
As she prepares the first meal of the day.
She counts the pennies ruefully,
Ha! Just enough for another meal.

She curses, yet again
The quirk of fate that has confined her
To this thatched shelter
They call home.

Though in the same breath
She warmly remembers that fateful night
When blessed she became, with her bundle of joy
Pillar to her he is, though still a child.

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